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    Pandemic or not, people are being diagnosed with cancer, including many young patients. Many cancer treatments affect fertility and oncofertility seeks to preserve fertility amongst these patients. The diagnosis of cancer is a shock in itself and then comes another — the risk of infertility. Presently, Covid-19 has added another angle to these discussions, pros and cons of which must be addressed with each patient. There are many confusing messages floating on the internet, given the current unpredictable Covid-19 situation. On the one hand, fertility treatment is usually an elective procedure and hence not a priority in these times of an already stretched health care system. On the other hand, urgent fertility preservation is needed for young cancer patients, who are going to undergo chemotherapy or radiotherapy, which also needs immediate action and treatment. Thus, this should not to be considered as an elective procedure for cancer patients. Oncofertility is when eggs, sperm or reproductive tissues are saved or protected so that a person can use them to have children in the future. While the current guidelines depend on the stage of the Covid-19 pandemic in the country and local infrastructure available, some salient features include: Sperm Banking for males before starting the treatment. Temporary Ovarian Suppression with drugs called Gonadotropin Hormone-Releasing Hormone (GnRHa), which are long-acting drugs that shut down the ovaries to protect them during cancer treatment and make a women go into temporary menopause. These are started before chemotherapy and is an available option in some women with the possibility to restore ovarian function after treatment. Embryo Cryopreservation for Couples or Egg Freezing for Single women, in which daily hormone injections are given for few days to grow the eggs which are then collected via a special surgical procedure and then frozen either as mature eggs or fertilised with the sperm and then frozen as embryos. This can delay the start of cancer treatment by few weeks. Thus, the urgency of starting anti-cancer treatment has to be factored in before considering. Ovarian Transposition is when the ovaries are moved away from the field of radiation but this again needs surgery. Hence, the pros and cons of admission and surgery during this pandemic will have to be strategised. The myriad predicaments at the time of this unprecedented pandemic range from whether there is an increased susceptibility of these patients undergoing fertility preservation to uncertainties regarding Covid testing. It is important to note that though the risk remains with Covid-19 for all of us, the treatment for cancer cannot wait for some patients and has to be started. On this background, oncofertility treatment is relevant, should be offered and discussed with all these patients. For cancer patients, oncofertility should be offered and considered if this can be safely performed and where resources are available. Follow local hospital Covid SOPs including testing guidelines for all oncofertility procedures. All in all, advances in oncofertility have given a lot of hope to preserve future fertility and reproductive health and form the cornerstone of managing young cancer patients. Let us not allow Covid to sidetrack us on this! Source Click here

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    When the lockdown was announced, many people not only rushed to the grocery store to stock up on essentials but some also ran to the liquor shop to bulk buy their favourite choice of liquor. These were not only the ones who enjoyed their daily glass of whiskey or wine but also those who thought it was better to have it, than not have it. But, soon enough, they also turned to alcohol for comfort and it started to turn into a sort of addiction. Self-isolation, unemployment, increased spare time, economic crises and family dynamics all contributed to this dependence. Loneliness, in particular, was shown to be responsible for an increased risk of alcoholism. Soon enough, with supplies running out, we witnessed a larger number of people facing withdrawal symptoms. Now with some liquor shops opening today, we have already seen the magnitude of madness for the 'drink'- courtesy news channels. Let's understand alcohol addiction first. According to Dr Sandeep Vohra, Senior Consultant Psychiatrist, Apollo Hospital, "Degree of alcohol dependence varies from person to person. There are two types of alcohol addiction - alcohol abuse and alcohol dependent. Alcohol abuse is when the person consumes alcohol 'on and off', while alcohol dependence is when a person cannot live without alcohol even for a single day, which is also called clinically alcohol dependence." Being weaned off alcohol and drugs can take weeks or months for those with a severe addiction, even with the support of friends and family. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome typically starts six to 24 hours after your last drink. The severity of alcohol withdrawal symptoms depends on the length of the time person has been having it and whether there have been any previous withdrawal episodes. The higher the number of each, the worse can be the withdrawal symptoms. As per Dr Vohra, those who have alcohol ocassionally, will not have much problems. But talking about alcohol dependence cases, the symptoms may include insomnia, sadness, irritability, constant craving for alcohol. Suggesting some easy tips to handle the addiction, Dr Vohra shared, Person should structure his day in such a way that they have a fixed time table. People who are working from home have a semi-structured day, while those who are not, it's important for them to plan their day in such a way that they don't have much idle time. You can have some other form of liquid at the time when you reach out for your glass of alcohol. You can have anything from lassi, green tea, tea or water. You must involve yourself in physical activity like walking, yoga, pranayama, meditation or any other physical activity. Having a positive mindset is equally important. Interact with people who give you good advise. Do not watch any videos that fuel your addiction or meet or talk to fellow mates with whom you used to drink with. If you have a spiritual streak, it becomes even easier for you to come out of it. You can pray to the almighty, to the higher power above or whatever you believe in, it will surely make things easier for you. Engage yourself in board games, play with your kids, family. Summing up, Dr Vohra says, "If it's still difficult for you to get out of the situation, you must consult mental health experts online as allowed by the government". Dr Soumiya Mudgal, Consultant, Psychiatry, Max Hospital Gurugram says, "If someone is into heavy drinking, they might need medical support. Though keeping yourself busy and distracted is the best way to keep away from drinking." She further adds, "Sleeping properly also helps you to withdraw successfully. Sleep and get up at the same time. Problem is for people who drink round the clock and not casual drinkers". Dr Rommel Tickoo , Associate Director – Internal Medicine, Max Super Speciality Hospital, Saket, says, "Casual drinkers will have only mild symptoms that will go away within a week. In severe cases, the symptoms can include confusion, seizures and delirium, these people need medical help". The best way to stop is by stopping gradually, exactly the way one started. Eating well, sleeping well, yoga, lots of water, meditation, deep breathing are some of the things that can help relieve stress and make it easy to manage the withdrawal symptoms,adds Dr Romil. Source Click Here

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    New Delhi/Noida: With lockdown leading to less interaction with the outside world and people remained inside their homes for more than a month now, there has been a significant rise in cases of depression and anxiety. In many cases, people who were suffering from depression had been unable to access antidepressants as they have old prescription from the doctors. Moreover, higher incidence of domestic violence is also being reported during the lockdown, as people with troubled relationships are forced to be in each other's presence all the time. In a case of suicide attempt reported from Delhi-NCR, a woman tried to commit suicide as she was forced to stay with her husband in lockdown when the couple was in the last stage of their divorce. "As many as 185 calls relating to domestic violence have been received by the Dial 112 helpline service in the Delhi-NCR during one month of lockdown starting from March 26 to April 25. However, only in handful cases the extreme domestic violence was seen where the females were beaten up by males that they needed medical intervention. Rest of the cases was resolved by the cops attached with police PRV vans," said a senior police officer of Noida police. Apart from this, cases of suicide and suicide attempts have also increased in past one month with police receiving at least 15 related calls in past one month. Cops said that in many cases those who have committed suicide have reason of mental stress behind it. In a few cases of suicide reported during past one month in the Delhi-NCR, a youth committed suicide after he didn't get enough likes on his TikTok videos while in another case a 24-year-old woman committed suicide after her in-laws denied her going to her parent's home due to lockdown. According to counsellors, there has been an increase of 60 per cent in the number of calls about Covid-19 related stress and people are complaining stress due to financial woes, caeer, business loss and insecure future etc. Cases of anxiety, frustration, panic attacks, loss or sudden increase of appetite, insomnia, depression, mood swings, fear and suicidal tendencies have become quite common. "It has been seen that negative emotions like fear, anxiety, and sadness are more contagious than positive emotions. As people are constantly talking and discussing about Coronavirus to their friends, family, relatives, neighbors and even strangers, there is significant transfer of emotion of fear and anxiety from one person to another. There is a sense of insecurity and uncertainty among people while the Social Media is also fueling up the pain," said Dr Deepali Batra, Sr consultant, clinical psychologist, Max hospital and Director PALS. It has been observed that there is a significant rise in people suffering from depression and anxiety during lock down especially patients who were suffering from psychiatric illness before, for some the ways to handle depression during these tiring times are as follows like be busy have regular schedule, distract yourself from negative thoughts by reading, listening music, watching TV, painting, gardening or any other hobby. "Be physically active, indoor activities like yoga, exercise, spend quality time with family members, communicate with friend and don't sit idle and brood, etc," said Dr Arti Anand, Consultant clinical psychologist Sir Gangaram hospital. Source Click Here

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    NEW DELHI: Due to the Covid-19 crisis elective surgeries, including organ transplants, have been suspended in the country. But emergencies cannot wait. Recently, the National Organ and Tissue Transplantation Organisation (NOTTO) – nodal body for organ and tissue transplant in the country – gave permission to Max Saket and Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences (ILBS) to conduct transplants on being told about three patients who would die without it. The donor was a 63-year-old man who had suffered from irreversible brain damage due to haemorrhage on April 18, at Max Saket. His family insisted on donating his organs so that someone could get a new lease of life. They patiently waited for the next couple of days while the hospital worked on obtaining special permissions for transplant. Also, the donor was tested for Covid-19 twice and when it was confirmed that he was not infected, organ retrieval was initiated. Both his kidneys and liver were retrieved and transplanted in three patients. The deceased was not fit for a heart or lung donation owning to his age. While the kidneys went to two women — Nisha (37) and Puneeta (55) — who were suffering from end-stage kidney failure, the liver was used to save the life of a 13-year-old girl. “The girl won’t have survived long without the transplant. Her parents were unable to donate part of their liver due to health issues,” Dr Vasanthi Ramesh, director of NOTTO, said. Apart from permission, another big challenge was to ensure safe surgery for the potential recipients. Doctors at both Max Saket and ILBS said they took special precaution — including wearing personal protective equipment — while operating on the patients. Anant Kumar, chairman, renal transplant and robotics at Max hospital said the surgeries were also difficult and tedious due to patient-related factors. “In one of the recipients, the arteries had become hard due to prolonged duration of renal disease and it was extremely difficult to join the donor’s kidney inside the recipient’s body. In the other patient, the bladder had shrunken significantly as she was on haemodialysis, so we had to carry out a special procedure to fix it,” he said. Source Click Here

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    With the Delhi-Gurgaon border sealed starting Friday morning, healthcare workers who live in the two cities were among those who found themselves stranded. On Thursday night, cancer surgeon Dr Mandeep Malhotra had to reschedule a surgery for a patient suffering from throat cancer after he realised he won’t be able to make it to Fortis Hospital in Vasant Kunj from his Gurgaon residence the next morning. Dr Tariq Matin, a Delhi-based neuro-interventionist, had to postpone a procedure too as he couldn’t make it to Narayana Superspeciality Hospital in Gurgaon. With the Delhi-Gurgaon border sealed starting Friday morning, healthcare workers who live in the two cities were among those who found themselves stranded. Apart from the long queues at border checkpoints, healthcare workers said they had to deal with police personnel, who didn’t let them pass despite their ID cards and explanations regarding the urgency of their work. The Gurgaon authorities have directed that those working there and living in Delhi and vice-versa should make living arrangements at or near their workplaces to avoid cross-border movement. Malhotra told The Indian Express, “I have been with this patient for two months and this surgery is important. I can delay a day or two, maybe even a week, but beyond that all our work will be undone and the cancer can progress.” He said the hospital has given them accommodation to stay back in Delhi, but he cannot as his aged grandmother and two young children stay with him. “One can stay away from home for two-three days but this is indefinite,” he said. What are human challenge trials, and why are they controversial? In homemade masks, two fabrics better than one Govt's guidelines for home isolation of mild and pre-symptomatic Covid-19 patients CLICK HERE FOR MORE Malhotra said even patients are in trouble as many cross the border for treatment. “I have a Gurgaon-based patient who got operated on for breast cancer. Now she needs post-surgery radiation. I asked her to get it done at a hospital in Gurgaon, but it turns out that a lot of its staffers live in Delhi, so her post-surgery radiation has not been scheduled.” At 7.30 am Friday, Dr R K Agarwal (58), senior consultant, anesthesia, at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, left his Gurgaon residence for work and reached in no time. On his way back in the afternoon though, he found himself pleading with police. “I work in a COVID hospital and, as an anesthetist, I work with ventilators, which are crucial right now. I showed the police personnel my ID card, a letter from the hospital saying this a COVID hospital, but he just didn’t listen. I felt humiliated. The AC in my car too wasn’t working and I told the policemen that I am tired, I am ageing and that they should let me go. I left the hospital at 1.30 pm and finally reached home at 4.45 pm,” said Agarwal. He said he is “fearful of going to work in the coming days”. Gurgaon-based Dr Ajay Singhal, head of department of anesthesia at Primus hospital in Delhi’s Chanakyapuri, said he didn’t go to work after he found out on Thursday that the border had been sealed. “Thankfully, we have Delhi-based anaesthetists… How can they expect us to make accommodation arrangements in Delhi?” Matin, the neuro-interventionist at Narayana Superspeciality Hospital, said that 40% of the Gurgaon hospital’s healthcare workers live in Delhi, and could not come to work Friday. “The nephrology unit is shut… Dialysis is very important. Other healthcare services shouldn’t suffer like this,” he said. Gurgaon-based Dr Anurag Gupta, a neurosurgeon at Fortis Vasant Kunj said: “NCR has always been one unit, and this sealing has made our life very tough. I am the only neurosurgeon at the hospital. I have asked a Fortis Gurgaon neurosurgeon who lives in Delhi to cover for me. My wife works at Fortis Gurgaon and several heads of department and the director have been unable to come because they live in Delhi.” A doctor with a private hospital in Delhi, who did not wish to be named, said she and her husband, also a doctor, reached the NH-8 toll plaza on the Delhi-Gurgaon border around 2 pm after completing their shifts and found a long queue of cars. “We knew that the order was coming into effect today so we left a little early to reach Gurgaon, where we live with our three-year-old son. We had to wait for two hours in the traffic before we reached the checkpoint, where we showed our hospital IDs and state government-issued passes, but police told us that they cannot allow us to pass,” she said. “There were 15-20 doctors besides us. Police also threatened an FIR against us. After much pleading, they finally let us go, with a warning that this was being done only for today and if we return without valid passes tomorrow, we should be ready to face charges,” the doctor said. Another doctor with Medanta Hospital in Gurgaon, who was on his way to work from Delhi, said he told police officials that he worked in an ICU and had valid passes. “They said only those with Central government passes would be allowed to go through,” the doctor said. G K Khurana, secretary general of the All India Government Nurses Federation, said: “Additional restrictions are causing problems in the movement of healthcare workers, many of whom have called us. Authorities should either allow their movement or make arrangements for their stay near their places of work.” Dr Arjun Dang, CEO of Dr Dangs Lab, said: “Diagnostic staff conducting coronavirus tests are facing difficulties due to shortage of manpower owing to transport issues.” Dr Ritu Garg, zonal director of Fortis Memorial Research Institute in Gurgaon, said while restricting movement across the border may help reduce transmission, “we also need to ensure medical assistance to patients on chemotherapy, dialysis and with other medical emergencies”. A spokesperson for Max Healthcare, which has hospitals in both Delhi and Gurgaon, said nearly 40% of their clinical, para-clinical and support staff travel between Delhi, Gurgaon and Faridabad. “Sealing at borders is forcing us to operate with limited manpower… Despite ID cards and passes issued by Delhi for healthcare workers, they are being stopped,” the spokesperson said. “We are trying to make arrangements for accommodation for mandatory essential staff in Delhi but that is another challenge with most hotels and accommodation facilities non-operational… Arranging transportation is another hassle,” the Max Healthcare spokesperson said. Source Click Here

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    In some states, private hospitals, especially in Tier II or Tier III cities, bank on business from non-Covid patients and are wary of the ‘mahamari aspatal’ tag. The premises of Southern Kolkata’s Remedy Hospital wears a deserted look, with stray staff attending to a few patients in the OPD. There isn’t any crowd either at the 681-bed Rabindranath Tagore International Institute of Cardiac Sciences (RTIICS). “Compared with about 1,000 patients visiting the hospital on a regular basis, only around 50 patients are coming now,” said RTIICS CEO R Venkatesh. Most private hospitals have witnessed a huge drop in footfall of patients in emergency as well as OPDs, and almost all patients have rescheduled their elective surgeries. From large hospital chains to smaller nursing homes, the lockdown and the Covid pandemic have re-shaped operations: revenues have dipped by 70-80 per cent, operating costs have jumped with hospitals required to provide staffers financial incentives, personal protective equipment (PPE), transport service, and even accommodation. At Hinduja Hospital in Khar, Mumbai, elective surgeries generated 80 per cent revenues, said its Medical Director, Dr Avinash Supe. “The occupancy is only 20 per cent since elective surgeries like cosmetic procedures, joint replacement, have completely stopped. We are treating only cancer and fracture cases. OPD has come down too,” he said. For the hospital, PPE, transport and accommodation, on the other hand, have added 10 per cent to the cost, he said. Operating a Covid facility is much more expensive, said Abhay Soi, Chairman, Max Healthcare, and CMD, Radiant Life Care. “It is thrice that at a regular hospital due to the cost of protective gear and tests we perform to ensure our healthcare workers are not infected. We also have to exercise caution in operating other facilities (25 per cent costlier now) so that patients with other critical conditions, and doctors and nurses treating them, do not get infected,” he said. Testing costs. Take for example, South Mumbai’s Bhatia Hospital where 51 staffers tested positive. It spent Rs 32 lakh to test over 700 staffers. “And these tests will be routinely done again and again,” said R B Dastur, medical director of the hospital. Then there are safeguards. “Our hospital requires 300 PPEs daily for its staff and we spend Rs 2.4 lakh a day on this,” said an administrator at Breach Candy Hospital in South Mumbai. “Our hospital’s income comes mostly from cardiac and stroke patients. But those cases have disappeared, we don’t know why. There may be salary cuts in other industries. But in private hospitals, we are paying over 20 per cent incentives to staffers who agree to work,” the administrator said. Some can take these extra costs, others, including several neighbourhood nursing homes, have locked themselves down. In Ruby Hospital in the city’s suburbs, staff attendance dropped by 40 per cent as soon as the first Covid cases trickled in. “We can’t afford PPE daily for every staffer. Some demanded a raise. With no patients, it is difficult to handle the increased cost,” a paediatrician from the nursing home said. The Breach Candy administrator said a hospital makes profits only if occupancy rates are 80-85 per cent. “Since the pandemic began, bed occupancy is hardly 30 per cent,” he said. At 20 per cent occupancy levels, revenues per quarter of private hospitals are likely to drop to Rs 18,000 crore from Rs 59,000 crore (pre-Covid) and losses at around Rs 22,000 crore, said Dr Sangita Reddy, Joint Managing Director, Apollo Hospitals Enterprises, and President, Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry. “The pain that the private sector is facing is the complete lack of revenue right now,” she told The Indian Express. “The ability to say that we can provide free treatment for Covid-19 is not (possible)… other nursing homes and smaller hospitals are in a very bad scenario too. Most of them are losing money and don’t know how to pay salaries,” Dr Reddy said. Said Dr Naresh Trehan, Chairman and Managing Director, Medanta – The Medicity: “Healthcare facilities are already cruising close to the ground in terms of revenues and profits. Now, the outbreak and lockdown has resulted in drop in revenue. There is a huge gap in our ability to pay our costs. We don’t want to get rid of our staff and we want to keep operations intact. The industry may have to borrow up to Rs 10,000 crore to keep alive,” he said. Unlike other industrial sectors, where the lockdown means units are shut down and staff stays home, said Reddy of Apollo Hospitals, hospitals don’t have that elbow room. “For (sectors like) aviation, you know they are shut down. They are closed, they are at home and it’s done till they reopen. For healthcare, not only do you have no patients, but you have to be open for the 10 per cent or 20 per cent who will come because they need you. On top of it, you have to also treat this unknown, critical and difficult to handle third type of environment (the outbreak)… and handle your staff’s insecurities,” she said. Trehan said there was a need for the government to support the working capital requirement at a lower interest rate. “We’re not asking for grants, because we know that the government is already under pressure,” he said. “Now that special COVID-19 hospitals have been created, there are no more Covid patients in hospitals like Medanta, so those who are non-Covid can come for their treatment without fear. Once that happens, the financial situation will improve,” he said. Ficci has, meanwhile, sought exemptions and waivers on indirect taxes, income tax benefits, deferment of statutory liability payments, and liquidity support. But some public health experts suggest that the industry always exaggerates its burden. A few hospital bills accessed by The Indian Express show that patients have been billed in the thousands for PPE used by hospital staff. In one instance, a Covid patient, who is admitted in a large private hospital for over 10 days now, was billed over Rs 8 lakh for treatment, with PPE costs running up to nearly Rs 50,000. The hospital is not being named since the patient remains admitted and the family shared the bills on condition of anonymity. Dr Shaktivel Selvaraj, Director, Health Economics, Financing and Policy, at the Public Health Foundation of India, estimates the average cost of treatment of a Covid patient admitted to the ICU for 10 days and on ventilator support at a hospital in the charitable sector at Rs 2.5-3 lakh, just a third of Rs 8 lakh the patient has been billed so far. Hospitals prefer brands that provide them higher commissions leading to higher costs for patients. “This holds good even during a pandemic,” said Malini Aisola representing All India Drug Action Network (AIDAN), a patient activist group. “We have observed that costs of repeated Covid testing, PPE etc are all offloaded to the patient.” Selvaraj said private hospitals and clinics have profited, even profiteered, over several years. “They should ideally be able to plough this money back at this time to manage. They have got land at concessional rates in some states, they have got electricity and water subsidised, and the only major cost for them is paying salaries. As long as they are able to pay their salaries, they should be able to get back their revenues… I can tell you, watch it for the next six months or so – no big, or even smaller clinics, are going to shut down. This is just a short-term phenomenon,” he said. In some states, private hospitals, especially in Tier II or Tier III cities, bank on business from non-Covid patients and are wary of the ‘mahamari aspatal’ tag. For instance, leading corporate hospital Paras HMRI in Patna refers four to five suspected Covid cases to specialised hospitals everyday instead of treating them itself. When asked why, S.A. Rahman, Medical Superintendent, Paras HMRI, said, “Because we have to take care of non-COVID-19 cases.” Source Click Here

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    While many medical treatments can be put off amid the COVID-19 crisis, “cancer does not wait”, oncologists feel. With people fearing about visits to hospitals amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, delayed diagnosis of cancer and its stage migration could be a fallout of the current crisis, according to senior oncologists. Coronavirus | Government urged to revoke patent on cancer drug While many medical treatments can be put off amid the COVID-19 crisis, “cancer does not wait”, oncologists feel. Cancer treatment in times of coronavirus has been challenging as the pandemic is impacting both cancer diagnostics and treatment, with doctors having to balance risks versus benefits on a daily basis. Dr. Bhawna Sirohi, director of Medical Oncology at Max Healthcare, said cancer is “not going to wait” and the threat from it is “now and real”. “I feel patients, scared because of COVID-19, are not coming to hospitals and that is pushing them from early cancer to late stages,” she told the PTI. Ms. Sirohi urged patients not to be scared to come to hospitals and if they have a warning sign like a lump, they should not delay treatment. She said she recently had a patient who ignored symptoms for three weeks and delayed consulting a doctor, but was later detected with cancer. COVID-19 is here to stay and one just has to get used to the precautions and make it a new normal, she said. “Stage 1 and 2 (of cancer) can become 3 and 4, it can become incurable, if you don’t act upon it,” Ms. Sirohi said. Talking about cancer treatment in times of COVID-19, she said a balance has to be maintained between risks and benefits. “If the benefit is very small then one should avoid chemotherapy. But if you have a patient with lymphoma or blood cancer then the cure rates are very high, so you would want to go for the benefits,” she said. Dr. Akshay Tiwari, Associate Director and Head, Musculoskeletal Oncology, Max Healthcare, said as a bone cancer surgeon he is facing challenges at multiple levels. Patients are finding it very difficult to travel and even those who have the wherewithal to travel, are scared of coming to the hospital for the fear of contracting coronavirus, he said. This means that patients who should have been seeking treatment are not doing so and that would lead to stage migration of cancer, Mr. Tiwari said. “Some cases may even become incurable because of the delay. We are fearing this as patients are not coming to us. Similar fears have been voiced by cancer specialists across the world,” he told the PTI. The message should go to the public that cancer does not wait and it is even deadlier than COVID-19, the senior oncologist said. “Diagnosis may also be delayed and that is what is unfortunate. The message needs to go out that we should not ignore symptoms which are remotely linked to cancer for example a lump or swelling,” he said. Dr. Rajender Kumar, Additional Director and Head of Oncology at Fortis Hospital, Shalimar Bagh, said the COVID-19 crisis is definitely posing a challenge to cancer treatment as many patients with malignancy in the head and neck area or having lung cancer have symptoms similar to COVID-19. “We are using all the precautions and the staff is using PPEs as cancer treatment is essential,” he told the PTI. Asked whether the COVID-19 pandemic can lead to delayed cancer diagnosis, Mr. Kumar said patients are coming to his hospital and their numbers have not decreased, but it is a possibility as most of the routine clinics and hospitals are shut down and people are not going to their doctors. “We don’t have data on it, but it can happen,” Mr. Kumar said. Dr. Niranjan Naik, Director, Surgical Oncology, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, said the COVID-19 crisis is posing a challenge as patients with low immunity are at a higher risk of contracting the virus. He said the key aspect while making decisions is the cancer doubling time which is different for different cancers, with blood cancer being very aggressive as compared with breast cancer. “Whenever any symptoms emerge, one should get proper medical investigations done even in the present times as cancer will not wait,” Mr. Naik told PTI. The oncologists insisted that technology must be used to reach out for medical advice and any symptom must be reported through a video conference appointment or an online OPD. As the nation fights one of its biggest health battles against COVID-19 pandemic, there are many individual battles being fought by bravehearts, both doctors and patients, to emerge victorious against other life-threatening diseases. Source Click Here

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    NEW DELHI: The number of healthcare workers affected by Covid-19 in Delhi crossed 200 on Monday with Max Healthcare confirming that 33 staff members at its Patparganj hospital had been found positive for novel coronavirus Of these 33 healthcare workers, 32 are currently admitted at at Max hospital Saket and one patient has been discharged Read more at: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/delhi/hospitals-become-hotspots-as-covid-care-exacts-heavy-price/articleshow/75417029.cms

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    The story discusses the journey and experience of a nurse who recovered recently from covid-19 infection. The story quotes Ms Sushma Devi, Nurse, Max Hospital Saket. Sushma Devi (24) was discharged on April 19 Flower petals, whistles and claps filled the air as 24-year-old Sushma Devi, a nurse working with a private hospital in Delhi, returned home after recovering from COVID-19. Wearing face masks, neighbours came out of their homes in Kishan Ganj, Vasant Kunj, to welcome the ‘corona fighter’ — in a stark contrast to reports of some healthcare workers being harassed in their localities. Posted in the liver transplant block of Max Hospital, Saket, Devi was discharged on April 19. “I reached home around 10 pm and was pleasantly surprised by the warm welcome from my neighbours. All of them were clapping for me… some even lit candles. I felt extremely special,” she told The Indian Express. Devi had resigned from the hospital in February but continued to be on duty during the notice period. On April 13, she gave a sample for testing after some healthcare workers in the hospital tested positive. “I was sitting in my room when the report came out… I felt helpless. I immediately informed my team and an ambulance was dispatched to my home to take me to the hospital. Within those few minutes, I pulled myself together. I thought about my patients who need me and that gave me courage…,” she said. Five days after she tested positive, the hospital tested her again on April 17 and the reports came out negative. “During my stay, I followed proper health hygiene, and the staff extended a lot of support and motivation,” said Devi, who was asymptomatic. Hailing from Manipur, she lives with her uncle. He and nine other family members who live in the same building were isolated after she tested positive. Her aunt and sister have tested negative. Devi has now been advised home isolation for 14 days. “There were many unfamiliar faces (at the hospital) but I found a common spirit among each of them. With my family under quarantine, neighbours pitched in to provide essential items — they would leave them outside our door. They all used to ask about my health and send their blessings,” said Devi. In Delhi, more than 75 healthcare workers across various hospitals have tested positive so far. Source : The Indian Express

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    दिल्ली के एक प्राइवेट अस्पताल ने कोविड-19 के मरीज़ों का 'प्लाज़्मा थेरेपी' से इलाज किया है. उनका दावा है कि इस इलाज से लोगों के स्वास्थ्य में सुधार देखने को मिल रहा है. भारत में कोविड-19 के इलाज के लिए प्लाज़्मा थेरेपी को सीमित तौर पर ट्रायल की सशर्त इजाजत भारतीय चिकित्सा अनुसंधान परिषद और ड्रग्स कंट्रोलर-जनरल ऑफ़ इंडिया को देना है. फ़िलहाल ये इजाज़त मैक्स अस्पताल को नहीं मिली है. लेकिन कम्पैशनेट ग्राउंड, यानी अनुकंपा के आधार पर मैक्स ने एक मरीज़ पर ये ट्रायल किया है और नतीज़े सकारात्मक आए हैं. मैक्स अस्पताल का दावा है कि कोविड19 का ये मरीज़ अब वेंटिलेटर पर नहीं है. 14 अप्रैल को उनका प्लाज़्मा थेरेपी से इलाज शुरू किया गया था. दिल्ली के इस मरीज़ की उम्र 49 साल है. इन्हें 4 अप्रैल को अस्पताल में बुख़ार और सांस लेने की दिक्कत के बाद अस्पताल में भर्ती कराया गया था. इनकी तबीयत धीरे-धीरे और बिगड़ती चली गई, फिर इन्हें ऑक्सीजन पर रखने की नौबत आ गई. उन्हें निमोनिया हो गया और 8 अप्रैल आते-आते मरीज़ को वेंटिलेटर सपोर्ट की ज़रूरत पड़ी. इसके बाद परिवार ने डॉक्टरों से प्लाज़्मा थेरेपी के ज़रिए इलाज करने की गुज़ारिश की. परिवार ने प्लाज़्मा के लिए डोनर भी ख़ुद ही ढूंढा और 14 अप्रैल को नए तरीक़े के साथ इलाज शुरू किया गया. मरीज़ 18 अप्रैल से वेंटिलेटर सपोर्ट पर नहीं हैं और फ़िलहाल स्वस्थ बताए जा रहे हैं. हालांकि डॉक्टरों ने उन्हें अपनी निगरानी में अस्पताल में ही रखा है. कौन होता है डोनर प्लाज़्मा थेरेपी से इलाज इस धारणा पर आधारित है कि वे मरीज़ जो किसी संक्रमण से उबर जाते हैं उनके शरीर में संक्रमण को बेअसर करने वाले प्रतिरोधी ऐंटीबॉडीज़ विकसित हो जाते हैं. इन ऐंटीबॉडीज़ की मदद से कोविड-19 रोगी के रक्त में मौजूद वायरस को ख़त्म किया जा सकता है. कोविड-19 में इलाज से ठीक हुए लोग ही इस थेरेपी में डोनर बन सकते हैं. इस थेरेपी के लिए जारी दिशा-निर्देश के मुताबिक, "किसी मरीज़ के शरीर से ऐंटीबॉडीज़ उसके ठीक होने के दो हफ्ते बाद ही लिए जा सकते हैं और उस रोगी का कोविड-19 का एक बार नहीं, बल्कि दो बार टेस्ट किया जाना चाहिए." ठीक हो चुके मरीज़ का एलिज़ा (एन्ज़ाइम लिन्क्ड इम्युनोसॉर्बेन्ट ऐसे) टेस्ट किया जाता है जिससे उनके शरीर में ऐंटीबॉडीज़ की मात्रा का पता लगता है. लेकिन ठीक हो चुके मरीज़ के शरीर से रक्त लेने से पहले राष्ट्रीय मानकों के तहत उसकी शुद्धता की भी जाँच की जाती है. मैक्स अस्पताल के ग्रुप मेडिकल डॉयरेक्टर डॉ. संदीप के मुताबिक, "डोनर वही बन सकता है, जिसको कोई दूसरी बीमारी ना हो. कोविड से ठीक हुए दो हफ्ते गुजर चुके हो. और किसी और तरह की दवाई का सेवन नहीं कर रहे हों. उनके रक्त की जांच की जाती है. हेपाटाइटिस बी, सी और एचआईवी के लिए. फिर से कोरोना की जांच की जाती है. इन सबकी रिपोर्ट निगेटिव आने के बाद डोनर की वेन्स चेक की जाती हैं. ऐसा इसलिए क्योंकि अगर डोनर की वेन्स बहुत पतली हो तो ये प्लाज्मा थेरेपी सफल नहीं हो सकती है." डोनर की शुरुआती जांच में 7- 8 घंटे का वक़्त लगता है. इसके बाद फिट डोनर के ख़ून से प्लाज़्मा निकाला जाता है. डॉ. संदीप कहते हैं, "डोनर से प्लाज़्मा निकालने में 2 घंटे का वक्त लगता है. डोनर उसी दिन घर जा सकता है और इस पूरी प्रक्रिया का डोनर पर कोई साइड इफेक्ट भी नहीं होता." दिल्ली के मैक्स अस्पताल में जिस मरीज़ का इलाज इस प्रक्रिया से हुआ है, उन्होंने अपने लिए डोनर ख़ुद ढूंढा था. सरकार से मान्यता कोविड-19 के मरीज का इलाज प्लाज़्मा थेरेपी से करने के आईसीएमआर और ड्रग्स कंट्रोलर-जनरल ऑफ़ इंडिया दोनों की मंज़ूरी लेनी होती है. केरल सरकार ने सबसे पहले इसकी मंज़ूरी मांगी थी. देश के अलग-अलग राज्यों से 30 से अधिक अस्पतालों ने इसकी इजाज़त मांगी है. मंज़ूरी मिलने के बाद इस थेरेपी का क्लीनिकल ट्रायल शुरू होगा. जिसके लिए डोनर की ज़रूरत पड़ेगी. भारत सरकार के ताज़ा आँकड़ों के मुताबिक़, देश भर में तकरीबन तीन हजार से ज़्यादा लोग कोविड-19 के इलाज के बाद ठीक हो चुके हैं. इनमें से जितने लोग 3 हफ्ते पहले ठीक हुए हैं वो डोनर बन सकते हैं. लेकिन इसके लिए वो सामने नहीं आ रहे. और यही है इस इलाज़ में सबसे बड़ी अड़चन. दिल्ली के इंस्टीट्यूट ऑफ लिवर एंड बिलियरी साइंस (आईएलबीएस) ने भी इसके लिए मंज़ूरी मांगी थी, जो उन्हें मिल गई है. आईएलबीएस के डॉ. एसके सरीन के मुताबिक़ कोविड-19 के मरीज़ तैयार हैं, लेकिन उन मरीज़ों पर क्लीनिकल ट्रायल के लिए उन्हें डोनर ही नहीं मिल रहे हैं. बीबीसी से बातचीत में डॉ. सरीन ने बताया कि डोनर ना मिलने की वजह से वो प्लाज़्मा थेरेपी का ट्रायल शुरू नहीं कर पा रहे हैं. जितने लोग कोविड-19 से ठीक हो कर गए हैं, उनके फ़ोन नंबर और परिवार के सदस्यों के सारे नंबर सरकार के पास उपलब्ध हैं. लेकिन जब उन लोगों से संपर्क साधा जाता है तो वो डोनर बनने से मना कर देते हैं. डॉ. सरीन के मुताबिक़ एक डोनर को एक से डेढ़ घंटे की काउसिलिंग डॉक्टर दे रहे हैं, इसके बाद भी लोग तैयार नहीं हो रहे हैं. कोई कमज़ोरी का बहाना बना रहा है, कोई लॉकडाउन का बहाना, कोई घर पर दूसरे लोगों तैयार नहीं है, ये कह कर बच रहे हैं. डॉ सरीन के मुताबिक़ इस मुद्दे पर जागरूकता फैलाने की ज़रूरत है. चूंकि ये बीमारी नई है और लोगों को इसके बारे में ज़्यादा मालूम नहीं है, ये सबसे बड़ी वजह है लोगों के डर की. हालांकि कोविड-19 के इलाज के लिए प्लाज़्मा थेरेपी कोई सटीक तरीक़ा अब तक माना नहीं गया है. देश में केवल कुछ जगहों पर ही इसके इस्तेमाल की सशर्त इजाज़त दी गई है, लेकिन वो भी करने में अब अड़चन का सामना करना पड़ रहा है. अकेले दिल्ली में लगभग 431 मरीज़ ठीक होकर अपने घर जा चुके हैं. डॉ सरीन के मुताबिक़ इन 431 में से 151 ही ऐसे हैं जिनके 3 हफ्ते हो चुके हैं और वो डोनर बन सकते हैं. केरल सरकार को अभी तक इस मामले में मंज़ूरी का इंतज़ार है. कैसे निकाला जाता है ख़ून ठीक हो चुके रोगी के शरीर से ऐस्पेरेसिस तकनीक से ख़ून निकाला जाता है जिसमें ख़ून से प्लाज़्मा या प्लेटलेट्स को निकालकर बाक़ी ख़ून को फिर से उसी रोगी के शरीर में वापस डाल दिया जाता है. मैक्स अस्पताल के डॉक्टर संदीप बुद्धिराजा के मुताबिक़, "ऐंटीबॉडीज़ केवल प्लाज़्मा में मौजूद होते हैं. डोनर के शरीर से लगभग 400 मिलीलीटर प्लाज़्मा लिया जाता है. इसमें से रोगी को लगभग 200 मिलीलीटर ख़ून चढ़ाने की ज़रूरत होती है. यानी एक डोनर के प्लाज़्मा का दो रोगियों में इस्तेमाल हो सकता है." डॉक्टर संदीप ने बताया कि इस थेरेपी का इस्तेमाल केवल कोविड-19 के सीवियर मरीज़ों के लिए ही किया जाना चाहिए. मैक्स अस्पताल का दावा है कि सरकार अस्पतालों को इस थेरेपी की इजाज़त देने में ज्यादा वक़्त लगा रही है. कितना कारग़र है ये इलाज डॉ. संदीप कहते हैं, "इस नई थेरेपी के इस्तेमाल से कोविड-19 के इलाज में एक नई तकनीक ज़रूर जुड़ गई है. लेकिन हमें ये भी समझना होगा कि ये कोई जादू की छड़ी नहीं है. हमने अपने मरीज़ पर कोविड-19 के इलाज में प्लाज़्मा थेरेपी के साथ-साथ बाक़ी दूसरे तरीक़ों को इलाज में शामिल रखा. जिससे ये पता चलता है कि ये प्रक्रिया 'केटेलिस्ट' यानी उत्प्रेरक का काम करती है. केवल प्लाज़्मा थेरेपी से ही सब ठीक हो रहे हैं, ऐसा नहीं है." चीन और दक्षिण कोरिया में भी इस इलाज का इस्तेमाल हो रहा है. Source : BBC Hindi

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  • Latest Updates  

    Max Healthcare Leadership is extremely proud of the relentless effort of our on ground teams against COVID 19. The entire Leadership team is working to support you in every way possible.

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    The initiative commenced on April 1, has seen successful distribution of 25,000 packed food parcels across Delhi Amidst a nationwide lockdown in the wake of coronavirus outbreak, Max Healthcare received an over-whelming response for its community support initiative to feed thousands of underprivileged across Delhi. This initiative, which commenced on April 1, has seen successful distribution of 25,000 packed food parcels across the city in the last one week. Cooked food packets were distributed in various JJ clusters at Munirka, Rajender Nagar, Hauz Rani and Lado Sarai. This arrangement will continue till the lockdown continues. This initiative is the brainchild of Abhay Soi, Chairman, Max Healthcare. Internal kitchens at Max Hospital, Saket and Shalimar Bagh units and the one at BL Kapoor Hospital prepare fresh and healthy meals that is packed and transported in special vehicles to various locations to be distributed. Along with meals distribution, a month’s supply of essential prescribed medicines has also been sent to Anand Ashram, located in Sector 58 in Gurugram, a home for male inmates with psychological disorders on request received from the home. Beginning with 2,000 meals on Day 1, the capacity was enhanced to 3,500 and 4,000 packed meals on Day 2 and Day 3 respectively and subsequently ramped up to 5000 meals a day post the third day. The parcels have been distributed by the hospital staff and those who are gathering to receive them are also being educated about the necessity to keep hands clean, not touch their eyes, nose and mouth; and the essence of social distancing. Reference : https://www.expresshealthcare.in/news/max-healthcare-launches-community-support-initiative-to-feed-thousands-of-underprivileged/418385/

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    At Max Hospital in Saket, a Coronavirus patient was administered with Plasma Therapy for the first time. He has now shown positive responses to the treatment and was put off from ventilator support recently. He was given the therapy by Doctor Sandeep Budhiraja.... Doctor was LIVE on ABP News and shared his experience.The patient is a 49-year-old male who was tested COVID-19 positive on April 4th. He was admitted in the hospital on the same day as he complained of respiratory issues #PlasmaTherapy #CovidTreatment #ABPNewsLive

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  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)  

    Thermal scanners effectively detect people who have developed a fever, but cannot detect people who are infected but are not yet sick with fever, since it takes 2-10 days before the infected person develops a fever.

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  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)  

    No. Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over the body will not kill viruses that have already entered your body. Only use these substances under appropriate recommendations because they can be harmful to eyes and mouth.

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  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)  

    No. Sesame oil does not kill the new coronavirus. Chemicals like bleach, chlorine based disinfectants, ether solvents, 75% ethanol, peracetic acid and chloroform can kill the 2019 nCoV on surfaces. However, these can be dangerous for your skin.

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  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)  

    No. Antibiotics do not work against viruses. Antibiotics should not be used to prevent or treat the 2019-nCoV, because it is a type of virus. You may receive antibiotics for bacterial co-infection.

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  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)  

    No. Hand dryers are not effective in killing the 2019-nCov. Wash your hands frequently with soap and water or clean them with alcohol based hand rubs. Follow that by drying them thoroughly with paper towels or a warm air dryer.

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  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)  

    No. Vaccines against pneumonia like pneumococcal vaccine and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib) vaccines, do not provide protection against the new coronavirus. Researchers are trying to develop a vaccine against 2019-nCoV.

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  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)  

    While garlic might have some antimicrobial properties, there has been no evidence that eating garlic can prevent the infection.

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